Posts Tagged ‘ Pennsylvania History ’

Hotel Sterling: Yesterday’s Papers are Such Bad News

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As Mick Jagger used to sing, “Yesterday’s paper’s are such bad news”,  and no truer words could be spoken about the Hotel Sterling, which has been reduced to rubble,  as of last week.  While demolishing the Hotel is still a controversial issue  among community members,  looking back at newspaper coverage since 2001, provides some important clues about why the project may have ultimately failed.

I did have this information up in another post titled “The Undead Days: Part 2”, which I am currently developing into another project about the Hotel Sterling, and as a result, had to remove the post from my website.  While much of the post was just a silly mash-up story, I think it is important to put the newspaper excerpts back out there for anyone who would like to read and digest what nuggets of insight may be contain within the facts that local journalists covering  the story felt were important to convey to the public.  This is by no means a complete list of all news stories about the Sterling.  But it may provide a starting point for anyone else who may be interested in delving into the topic, as reported to by the local newspapers in the past.

Hotel Sterling in the News

The advance state of disrepair the Hotel Sterling has fallen into in downtown Wilkes-Barre has local historians worried about its future.”—The Valley’s Vanishing History”, Citizens’ Voice, March 18, 2001  

Congressman Kanjorski has also been working behind the scenes for years to create opportunities for the resurrection of the Sterling.  On Wednesday, the federal lawmaker confirmed that last week he led a developer on a tour of the Sterling.  He has been in touch with four different developers over the past year.  He declined to identify them but stressed that it is important to get the Sterling in the hands of CityVest so that redevelopment proposals could be solicited to get the project moving forward.” — “Developers interested in Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, May 9, 2002

The 425 room hotel was a symbol of Wilkes-Barre’s prominence.  Now, it’s a symbol of the city’s decay.–“Saving City, Sterling Go Hand in Hand”, Times Leader, December 17, 2002

CityVest is working to put the vacant hotel in moth balls and prevent additional damage from the elements“–Saving City, Sterling Go Hand in Hand”, Times Leader, December 17, 2002

Private development is the key to resurrection for the quickly declining hotel–“Saving City, Sterling Go Hand in Hand”, Times Leader, December 17, 2002

If projects like the inflatable damn, the downtown museum and the River Commons recreation area pan out, it will make the Sterling more attractive to developers.  But it won’t be enough.–“Saving City, Sterling Go Hand in Hand”, Times Leader, December 17, 2002

And unless we turn the tide, we’ll forever be a city that has seen better days, and the shell of the Sterling will stand as proof.  We can still hook a developer for the Sterling if things don’t turn around, but we’ll have to use smoke and mirrors. We’ll have to hide the newspapers when prospects visit, so they won’t read about our dirty politics, disappearing doctors, etc.–“Saving City, Sterling Go Hand in Hand”, Times Leader, December 17, 2002

 “In the past few months, other developers near and far have shown interest in the hotel, (Alex) Rogers said.  In addition, he added, residents, architects and others have offered to assist CityVest, which has secured the complex of buildings in an attempt to reduce further weather-related damage.”  — “Some Sterling Examples”, Times Leader, April 3, 2003   

Lincoln was chosen to find a developer (for the Hotel Sterling) because the firm has acquired a lot of experience in the region.  It has played a major role in guiding commercial development on Highland Park Boulevard near the Wachovia Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township and recently completed a detailed market study of Wilkes-Barre for the Diamond City Partnership. —“National Firm Will Market Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, September 16, 2003

Gary Brandeis, senior vice president of Lincoln Properties and James Stevenson, vice president, were introduced, and both expressed confidence that the Sterling complex would be successfully transformed. —“National Firm Will Market Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, September 16, 2003

CityVest paid $1 million for the dilapidated Sterling complex in November 2002 at sheriff sale, a benchmark event following years of abandonment, decay and protracted litigation. —“National Firm Will Market Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, September 16, 2003

CityVest was provided with a $1 million federal grant from U.S. Rep. Paul Kanjorski, D-11 & a $4 million loan from the Luzerne County Office of Community Development.  Wilkes-Barre City, the Wilkes-Barre Area School District and Luzerne County agreed to forego $1 million in back taxes and penalties to facilitate the purchase and redevelopment of the Sterling. —“National Firm Will Market Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, September 16, 2003

In January 2003, CityVest retained a team of local architects and engineers to assist them to stabilize and protect the complex from further decline. —“National Firm Will Market Sterling”, Citizens’ Voice, September 16, 2003

 With $9 million already raised, the corporation must look for new ways to come up with the remainder of the cash (to cover the first part of the project in excess of $29 million). “We anticipate raising private sector money and will continue to seek public assistance as well”, the chairman said.  Rogers said that with the capital that CityVest has already secured, the corporation could actively market the building. –- “Imagine the Possibilities”, The Sunday Voice, October 10, 2004

Renovations to the Hotel Sterling will begin this spring and will not be completed until at least 2007, according to CityVest Chairman Alex Rogers.  However, he said he has already fielded over 20 inquires about the proposed condominiums and offices. – “Market Shows interest in Condominiums”, The Sunday Voice, October 10, 2004    

Working from the seventh floor down, obvious challenges to redevelopment could be seen everywhere.  The building has problems with infestation and mold, and also sustained heavy water damage due to prolonged leakage in the roof.  A hole opened in the seventh floor penthouse suite, and Rogers said water came pouring into the building for four months.  Because of that, the suspended ceilings in many of the former apartments have crumbled, sending debris onto the floor.—“Imagine the Possibilities”, The Sunday Voice, October 10, 2004

 The commissioner (Vonderheid) said the Sterling project was specifically important because he feels there is a need for high end housing in the City of Wilkes-Barre.—“Market Shows Interest in Condominiums”, The Sunday Voice, October 10, 2004

The mayor agreed there is a market for upscale housing in the city of Wilkes-Barre.  “I’ve been told that if the housing industry changed in the city of Wilkes-Barre, people who live in the suburbs would seriously consider moving back into the city”, Leighton said.—“Market Shows Interest in Condominiums”, The Sunday Voice, October 10, 2004

 “The governor’s award of $3 million made it clear that we had sufficient capital to complete the project”, Alex Rogers, City Vest executive director — “Sterling Gets Developer”, Times Leader, December 1, 2004 

“CityVest, the nonprofit corporation driving the rehabilitation of the Hotel Sterling is no longer shopping the decrepit landmark to private developers, but is planning to take on the project itself”……“Interest in a reincarnated Sterling has already begun to manifest itself, (Alex) Rogers said.  “The number of inquiries we have received from people waiting to live or work in a refurbished Hotel Sterling has vastly surpassed any of our individual expectations.”—“CityVest To Do the Job Using Millions in Grants”, Times Leader, December 1, 2004 

“CityVest shifted gears from marketing the Sterling to developers to becoming the developer after receiving millions of dollars in state funding in September.”–“CityVest To Do the Job Using Millions in Grants”, Times Leader, December 1, 2004

The initial phase of the project has been projected to cost about $22 million.  Thus far, about $8 million in cash has been promised by federal, state and county sources, and $1 million in tax forgiveness has been by the city, county and school board.  “We are going to need a lot of private financing to go with the public money”, Rogers said.  -– “Firms:  Sterling Project Can Thrive”, Times Leader, April 15, 2005

He (Rogers) agrees with Congressman Paul E. Kanjorski, that the Hotel Sterling might be eligible for federal tax credits meant for development projects in low-income communities. –“State Ensuring Preservation of Hotel Sterling’s Legacy:  Bureau for Historical Preservation Will OK CityVest’s Progress”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

 “Without any formal marketing, CityVest board members can’t go to any functions in town without somebody expressing interest”, Rogers said..–“State Ensuring Preservation of Hotel Sterling’s Legacy:  Bureau for Historical Preservation Will OK CityVest’s Progress”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

 

The building schedule has not been established.  That’s up to CityVest which is still making environmental inspections and consulting with the state Bureau for Historical Preservation to make sure the landmark’s historical integrity is protected.–“Historic Landmarks Offer Potential, Pitfalls for Architects”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

To date, the bureau remains pleased with the relationship with CityVest.–“State Ensuring Preservation of Hotel Sterling’s Legacy:  Bureau for Historical Preservation Will OK CityVest’s Progress”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

 

Currently, CityVest has accounted for about $9 million of the projected $20 million to $22 million needed for renovation.  But Rogers is optimistic about CityVest’s chances of raising the needed $10 million to $12 million..–“State Ensuring Preservation of Hotel Sterling’s Legacy:  Bureau for Historical Preservation Will OK CityVest’s Progress”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

 “The state is filled with historic structures facing demolition, he said. He’s been working with the owners of the massive former Pennhurst State School and Hospital in Chester County, which has an unknown future.  One of Kimmerly’s (of Preservation Pennsylvania) colleagues is involved in the potential demolition of a vacant former brewery in Allentown. “These are difficult times economically. Private funders don’t have money. The government doesn’t have any money, and typically that’s where money comes for historic preservation,” Kimmerly said. – “Preservation Pennsylvania is monitoring Hotel Sterling”, Times Leader, April 3, 2011

As the nonprofit CityVest embarked on the Hotel Sterling renovation project in 2001, officials and residents in a smaller Ohio city were taking on a similar project to try to save their deteriorating historic hotel. But while the Hotel Sterling is facing possible demolition, the Fort Piqua Plaza in Piqua, Ohio, is now home to a library, coffee shop, banquet hall, community museum and art gallery, said James Oda, director of the Piqua Public Library housed in the building. “It was a controversial issue locally. We had people who said, ‘Why don’t we tear it down and start over?’ Others said, ‘No. This is part of our community’s heritage,’” Oda said. “Fortunately, people who wanted to preserve the building opened their pocketbooks,” Oda said…….. “The private donations came from sources as diverse as an elementary school selling popsicles to some multimillion-dollar donations primarily from a prominent family,” Oda said. –“Ohio City’s Hotel Saved”, Times Leader, April 3, 2011   (NOTE:  The building opened in 2008)

The owner of the landmark Hotel Sterling wants Luzerne County government to determine the fate of the deteriorating structure, which would cost up to an estimated $26.8 million to $35.6 million to fully restore, according to a new study. CityVest asked county commissioners to decide whether the building will be saved or demolished because the county provided $6 million in funding for the nonprofit to acquire and preserve the building. “In recognition of the substantial investment the county has made and the broad community interest, we ask the county to review this study, select the preferred future direction, acquire title and serve as project manager,” the study says.—“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

The possibility of demolition of the River Street landmark has generated lots of debate since it became public last month, after a decade of promises that the building would be restored. Picketers have urged officials to save the once luxurious hotel, while others have demanded an end to government subsidy of the project. . ..CityVest, known as a last-resort developer, assumed ownership of the building from a back-tax sale in 2002.—“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

Renovating and converting the downtown Wilkes-Barre property into 32 condos, offices and retail space would generate an estimated $15.3 million in revenue, leaving a net government investment in the project of $11.5 million to $20.2 million, said the study released Friday by the building’s nonprofit owner and developer, CityVest. Demolition and site preparation would cost $900,000 to $1.2 million, the study says.—“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

The study is packed with deficiencies in the building.    Roofing experts estimated it would cost more than $1.4 million to complete permanent repairs to the roof framing and install a new rubber roof and roof drainage.  Despite roof shoring in 2007, some portions of the roof are collapsing, and water is getting into the building in “significant volumes,” the study said. The floor is sagging in numerous areas, and there’s evidence of mold and other potential toxins, including a “pretty, green ‘carpet’ of moss on some floors, ceilings and walls.” “If there is mold growing in the cells of the floor system (or even if public perception is that it is there), the building might not be insurable at an economic level,” the study says. The building’s structural steel system appears sufficient, but beams that have been regularly exposed to moisture may need to be repaired and replaced. The windows would also have to be replaced. Water is getting into the building in “significant volumes,” according to Keast & Hood Co. The brick masonry at the rear of the structure needs “considerable repair, re-pointing and cleaning.” The study says a major snow load, high wind storm or movement of the make-shift support bracing could result in a catastrophic failure of the building or integrity of the exterior façade. “The observations of local contractors and engineers further confirm these conditions to the point where concern has been expressed about the safety of anyone entering the upper portion of the building or performing any work in that area,” the study says.—“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

CityVest has provided detailed funding and site information to potential private developers, met with them and in one instance signed a letter of intent, the study says. “Every potential developer – including the firm that had signed the letter of intent – ultimately withdrew themselves from consideration,” the report said. All the developers who walked away from the project identified the cost of repairs as the reason, particularly when they couldn’t guarantee they could sell or rent the residential and/or commercial space at price points that would cover their expenses, the study said. —“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

Among the building deficiencies identified by developers:   Low ceiling height, compromised views from small windows, an inefficient layout for use as residential or hotel units, unusable space created by the large lobby and atrium, inconsistent floor elevations on the second floor, narrow elevators that don’t comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, concern that replacement of the floors could risk structural instability of the building because of the way the floors are anchored to the building’s perimeter walls.– “Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

The building has “physically and functionally” lost its status as a center of downtown Wilkes-Barre over the last 40 years..– “Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

“Vacant, stripped of every item that contributed to a memorable experience, the remaining shell is cold, damp and lifeless,” said the study, which was prepared by Susquehanna Real Estate LP. “The current condition is not only poor, but also dangerous.” —“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

County Controller Walter Griffith told commissioners Wednesday that he is still auditing records on how the $6 million was spent, though his findings to date convince him that the county should have been more closely monitoring the project..  —“W-B building ‘emergency’ “, Times Leader, April 21, 2011

CityVest officials defended their handling of the project in a letter to citizens, saying the government funding was used to pay inherited back taxes, demolish an adjoining structure, acquire land to make the parcel larger and remove “cheap and rotting” interior walls in drop ceilings in the 113-year-old hotel. —“Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

CityVest on Wednesday issued a statement in response that said a developer pulled out of the Sterling Hotel project in early 2010 when it was learned the $3 million was redirected. CityVest disputes the city’s claim that certain conditions were not met.—“CityVest, City Clash on $3M”, Times Leader, June 23, 2011

“Federal investigators following up on a grand jury subpoena issued last week to the Luzerne County commissioners took possession Monday of hundreds of documents chronicling the failed rehabilitation of the historic Hotel Sterling in Wilkes-Barre, officials said.”—“Feds Seize Hundreds of Hotel Sterling Documented”, Times Leader, December 7, 2011

If an agreement isn’t reached, Wilkes-Barre eventually may be forced to demolish the city-condemned structure at its expense. The city would then have to put a lien on the property in an attempt to recoup the money, though the county would also be in line with its own lien for $6 million.—“ CityVest yet to sign deal on Sterling”, Times Leader, February 9, 2012

CityVest owes the county $6 million loaned to preserve and market the structure, and the county has set aside another $1 million in community development funding for demolition. The nonprofit asked the county to take over the project last year because it’s out of money.  —“Architect wants to mothball Sterling”, Times Leader, February, 21, 2012

(Carl) Handman, who had worked on the Sterling project in 2003, has publicly criticized the building’s nonprofit owner, CityVest, for failing to heed his past recommendation to mothball the structure to prevent further deterioration. CityVest representatives have said the nonprofit relied on project manager Lincoln Property Co.’s expert opinion on what work should be completed with the limited funds allocated for the project. —“Architect wants to mothball Sterling”, Times Leader, February, 21, 2012

What did the interior of the Hotel Sterling actually look like at this point?  

See for yourself at

Hotel Sterling video: As The Vultures Picked Her Bones

A March 2011 report released by the Sterling’s nonprofit owner, CityVest, contained a $1.2 million estimate to demolish the property. The study also references a 2009 roofing company estimate of $1.4 million to redo the roof, replacing the wood framing with steel and metal. Other portions of the CityVest study say it will cost anywhere from $5 million to $7.7 million to stabilize and mothball the 114-year-old building at the corner of River and Market streets. —“Architect wants to mothball Sterling”, Times Leader, February, 21, 2012

Mothballing would involve structural work, roof repairs, window sealing and ventilation.  –“ Several Luzerne County Council members are willing to consider mothballing the landmark Hotel Sterling for potential future development, but most are leaning toward proceeding with demolition”, Times Leader, February 23, 2012

 The demolition of the Hotel Sterling began on July 25, 2013

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You can see Hotel Sterling Time Lapse Demo Video HERE

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Return To Guerrilla History

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

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Hotel Sterling: History Deconstructed

Hotel Sterling:  History Deconstructed

Whose Version of History Gets to be Saved?

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Featuring a “Grand Luxury” Finale

of Hotel Sterling Demolition Photography

by Steve Woitkowski of

Capture the Moment Photography Studios

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The definition of “history” is the past considered as a whole.  So until last week, the Hotel Sterling wasn’t “history”, it was actively part of the present.  The Hotel Sterling was still a “verb” in our community. 

This is what I find myself contemplating:   Considering that since 1964 the building had seriously declined way past the point where it was even being used as a hotel, which historical version of the building were historians and preservationists trying to “sell” to us as part of our collective history?

And, more importantly, whose history were they actually telling with that version?

Are there more people alive today, who have experienced the Hotel in the way that its history was being packaged for consumption, or do the majority of Luzerne County residents who are still alive, have a much different, and more important, history to recall about the Hotel Sterling?

To me, as an Urban Explorer, documenting the fallout from the financial decline of our community, it represents something MUCH different than a fancy Grand Luxury Hotel where people used to dine in The Palm Room, and dance the night away in the ballroom.

It's a Zombie Ballroom now at the Hotel Sterling

To most people in Generation X, Generation Y and whatever generation we are at now, the decrepit Hotel Sterling has never been anything close to that vision for them either.  In fact, for more than HALF of the years in the “life” of the Hotel Sterling, it looked NOTHING like the image that preservation proponents were trying to spoon-feed to the public.

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Sterling 2

For the majority of her years as a part of Luzerne County’s history, the Hotel Sterling was not THAT hotel being portrayed by preservationists—that “history” is only true for the years occurring between 1897 and 1949, which is only 52, of the Hotel Sterling’s 116 years, as a part of the Luzerne County community.

Then from 1949 to the day demolition began, 64 YEARS LATER, the reality is that the Sterling existed as a downgraded, community-centric version of its former self, until it eventually declined to the point of existing as a mold infested, water damaged, hunk of derelict, community resource pillaging,  real estate for the last few generations of Luzerne County residents to experience in the physical form.

How do you really interpret “collective history” when everyone’s experience, even of the physically present, can be so vastly different?  How do you ultimately decide whose “history” is most important to consider, and what gets to be documented, remembered and revered?

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Whose story gets to be told—the living or the dead?  The rich or the poor?  The young or the old?   And how long is it OK to put off creating the history of the future, in order to attempt to save the history of the past?

Sterling 9

I take real issue with people trying to sell any community on an historical preservation attempt that may not necessarily be in their best financial interest, based upon the assertion that buildings somehow ARE the heart and soul of that community.  Buildings and institutions are often more exclusionary in nature, than inclusive.   And I don’t mean that these places openly segregate community members in an overt fashion.  I’m talking about the kind of subtle socioeconomic based exclusion, that often goes unacknowledged by the people doing the excluding, but is felt at a core level by those being excluded.

Sterling 8

Obviously, the more affluent classes had wider access to the Hotel Sterling during its prime years as a Grand Luxury Hotel.  It was ultimately constructed strictly for the purpose of meeting the needs of the elite and business classes, while they were here in Luzerne County, exploiting the lower classes for profit. Working class people didn’t have the financial or social privilege of accessing that “string orchestra/Lobster Thermidor” version of the Hotel Sterling nearly as often as the wealthy got to have it.  The coal miners, for example,  with their dirty clothing and soot covered faces couldn’t belly up to the bar on their way home from work, to throw back a few beers, next to the same kind of people who were exploiting them for profit.

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Sterling 1

Sure as the “Grand” version of the Hotel began to slowly devolve, it became more inclusive to a larger portion of the Luzerne County community, as a venue for social club meetings and high school graduations.  More people of a different class structure began mingling at the bar. 

Sterling 4

And as the decline to eventual abandonment continued, the now decrepit Hotel Sterling became low income housing for the elderly, including some of those coal miners.  But much like the version of the Hotel Sterling that they lived in then, the retired coal miners were also slowly dying, because of the now diseased lungs that were inflicted upon them, as they worked for the people for whom the very Hotel Sterling was constructed,  for use as a Grand Luxury Hotel, and then cast aside, like the workers themselves, when no longer useful.

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Hotel Sterling Lobby During the 1972 Agnes Flood

And even at that point, a large portion of the Luzerne County population was STILL excluded from access to the now decaying Hotel Sterling,  based upon a different set of socioeconomic and age restrictions.  Until the day came when the doors closed for one last time, and an entire generation went through life in Luzerne County, with no active access to the Hotel Sterling whatsoever.  At least not by walking through the front door!  😉

Abandoned Hotel Sterling: The Harsh Light of Day

The Harsh Light of Day

Cheri Sundra–Guerrilla Historian

Actually, you could make a strong argument for the fact that the Hotel Sterling has robbed Generation X and Generation Y , of their own shot at experiencing a “Grand Luxury” version of their community and their future, because a blighted structure, with little hope of successful redevelopment, lingered for too long, on a prime parcel of real estate, impeding future economic growth in their hometown.   THAT’S the version of history that ALL of us will recall about the Hotel Sterling, and unfortunately, it’s the history that will have the most impact upon Luzerne County’s future.

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Sterling

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

4Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Photo Credit:  Steve Woitkowski

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Return To Guerrilla History

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

The Hotel Sterling: Five History Lessons

The Hotel Sterling: Five History Lessons

(What is history REALLY telling us?)

Featuring the photography of Dawn Robinson & Stacy Shannon

With Ed Mountjoy of The Forgotten Places of NEPA, who ultimately  gets the last word!

DawnPhoto Credit: Dawn Robinson of Nocturnal Echo Imagery

About a decade or so ago, it was trendy in declining communities to sell people on the notion that historic preservation was the ticket to imparting eternal life. But as the literature of those who try to cheat death has shown us, the bid for immortality can come at a huge price.  While the walking dead may be all the rage in pop culture, no city wants to find itself plagued by zombie buildings, a term being adopted nationwide to describe the disease afflicting places where buildings are difficult to lease, or sell, because they are in physical disrepair, and their owners lack the resources to bring the building up to code .  Unfortunately, using millions of taxpayer dollars that were supposed to be spent on our city’s financial resuscitation, it appears that Wilkes-Barre has created a Zombie Hotel instead. 

The demolition of the once grand Hotel Sterling really only leaves one question–Why?  Why do beautiful things fall to disrepair?  Why did our community allow this place, with such a romanticized past, fall to ruin?  Why did this beloved building turn into a memento mori of Wilkes-Barre’s prosperity?  

StacyPhoto Credit: Stacy Shannon

Every time a historical landmark is left to die, a community is left   to confront failure.  The building failed to live up to expectations, the owners failed to maintain the structure, and  the community leaders failed to create a local market that could sustain successful business development.   Sadly, happy stories of rehabilitation and rescue are few and far between for the majority of places across the nation.  Instead the failure to preserve historic landmarks seems to be serving as the signal of the kind of economic collapse that begins with the start of a zombie building apocalypse in struggling communities nationwide.

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s three largest cities, including Wilkes-Barre, are currently standing on the ledge, looking into the abyss of financial failure.  Decades of arbitration-mandated labor-related costs are rising faster than tax revenues, large numbers of untaxed buildings are owned by nonprofits, and stagnating tax bases are deeply rooting these communities into the same dire financial situation that has contributed to the total collapse of cities like Detroit and Camden. 

Dawn 1

Photo Credit: Dawn Robinson

About a decade ago, Wilkes-Barre’s leaders presented our community with a big plan that was supposed to save it from the same fate facing her two sister cities–Scranton and Hazleton.  This agenda, primarily consisting of historic preservation, was called the “Susquehanna Landing” project.  The plan included a newly renovated Hotel Sterling packed with shiny new residential units.  There would be yet another city parkade built which would somehow become part of the Luzerne County owned, and still vacant, Springbook Water Company, located behind and to the right of the Hotel Sterling.  There would be a museum in the still vacant Sterling Annex building,  which would connect  via some elaborate, elevated walkway system, to some newly built conference center that would somehow be linked to the still vacant Irem Temple, which is currently owned by the Chamber of Commerce. 

What was ultimately missing from this plan was a NEED for all of this redevelopment in the first place.

Hotel Sterling Historical Lesson #1—Create a Need

You construct your vision around a need that already exists.  You don’t attempt to build something that you hope will create one.  When the Hotel Sterling was built, droves of immigrants were motivated to cross the ocean to come to Luzerne County to work in our mining industry.  Coal was King and trains were depositing, and retrieving, large gatherings of business men at the train station on a daily basis.  It was because of this activity, that the Hotel Sterling was actually constructed.  These people needed somewhere to sleep, have meetings and entertain while visiting Wilkes-Barre for business purposes.   We didn’t build it in the hopes that they would come, we HAD to build it because they were already here!  If you don’t have a solid and identifiable need for your Susquehanna Landing-esque “vision of the future”, you have to begin by creating the “need”, not the vision. 

 Dawn 3

Photo Credit: Dawn Robinson

Hotel Sterling Historical Lesson #2—Look to the future, not the past

I am puzzled by the sentimental idea that we are “losing our soul” with the demolition of the Hotel Sterling.  No structure is the “soul” of a community….especially one that was built to cater to the rich and business classes, in a community that was predominately built by the exploitation of the working class.  In fact, it was BECAUSE of the working class that this structure was brought into existence, because the coal miners created the NEED for the Hotel Sterling.  BUT the coal miners, with their dirty clothing and soot covered faces would have surely been turned away if they showed up at the Hotel during the luncheon hour, or for a few beers at the bar on their way home from work.  When it was first built, the Hotel Sterling was strictly a venue constructed for “the 1%” exclusively, unless you happened to work for the Hotel.

Sure, as the place began to decline, it became more community-centric and the average person may have found themselves there, once or twice, for the occasional prom or office Christmas party.  But when we look back upon idealized memories of the Sterling, those usually aren’t the recollections that are looked upon with great historical significance, unless of course, a President or other famous figure happened to be passing by or staying at the Hotel.

Stacy 1Photo Credit: Stacy Shannon

And certainly, no one is looking back fondly at the last years of the building when it was still active, but had declined to the point that its only viable use was as low income housing.  No, this is a venue that historians like to recall with tales of string orchestras and Lobster Thermidor, not financially struggling elderly people existing in a building that was declining around them. 

What about the people who never had the chance to experience the Sterling at all, if it is the “soul” of our community?  What if you live in Wilkes-Barre and came of age AFTER the Hotel Sterling shut its doors forever?  Have those young people existed in a soulless community?  Doesn’t anything that they have grown up experiencing in Wilkes-Barre matter at all?  It’s silly to attach such extreme value to a building. Especially when history has taught us that great economic growth, as well as our future, is often connected to the creation of new buildings full new memories for the up and coming generation.

Dawn 6Photo Credit: Dawn Robinson

Once upon a time, there stood a music hall, where popular plays and musical comedies were performed.  People of that community remembered that venue fondly, sitting at the gateway to Wilkes-Barre.  Then the day arrived when that parcel of real estate seemed far too valuable for such a singular venue, and the music hall was demolished to make room for the Hotel Sterling.  After all, the Hotel was needed to meet the requirements of the growing population and industry that was knocking at the door of Wilkes-Barre. 

People looking towards the future; spend little time dwelling in the outmoded needs of the past.  We need leaders who think about our future!  You never have to mourn the loss of your past, if you are replacing it with a future that is brighter.  Only communities that lack hope for the future, cling so desperately to their “glory days” at all costs!

 

Hotel Sterling Historical Lesson #3—Historical Preservation

as an agenda does not assure a successful redevelopment project

It’s interesting to note that Preservation Pennsylvania, along many other preservation centered organizations, is NOW issuing recommendations about assessing financial feasibility when considering Historical Preservation Projects.   Many see this as a reaction to the failed trend in pushing historic preservation as a redevelopment plan in declining communities, as well as the fact that economic conditions nationwide are signaling an overall decline in America’s financial health.  Historic Preservation of a long-term vacant building is ALWAYS ultimately more expensive than new construction.

 In the publication, “How To Protect and Preserve the Historic Places That Matter to You, Preservation Pennsylvania provides a series of “reality checks” for assessing a project’s financial feasibility, a topic that often goes unmentioned when emotional attachment reigns during community discussions that involve “saving” beloved landmarks.  In fact, those pushing a “preservation agenda” will stop at nothing to see that a building is “saved” in the name of “history”, even if it requires completely stripping EVERYTHING from the structure that contributed to a memorable experience at that location, just for the sake of saving nothing but the shell of a building.  That’s an expensive proposition that will not be economically feasible for building owners and developers to entertain in communities facing financial issues like Wilkes-Barre.   

Stacy 5 Safe

Photo Credit: Stacy Shannon

In a section titled “Reality Check—Know when it’s time to walk away”, Preservation Pennsylvania says “There is no formula that can be used to determine when to call it quits, but if you are honest with yourself, clear on your objectives, and really understand the limitations of your resources, you will know when it is time to congratulate yourself for making the effort, learn from what didn’t work, and walk away.”  

I was recently asked whether or not the Hotel Sterling should have/could have been saved, in an interview for 570 Mine Fire.  Here is a portion of that interview:

“I’m a realist. I believe that the biggest error was in not demolishing the Hotel Sterling sooner. I do not believe that it was ever financially savable, even way back when it was still structurally savable. And both components have to be there in order to create a successful outcome in a preservation attempt. Just because a structure is historical, does not mean that it will result in a successful redevelopment project. I think that when CityVest ran out of their first batch of funding without a developer in sight, that the community should have just congratulated them for their efforts, and called it quits right there. But instead we found a way to find them even more money, despite the fact that developer after developer kept passing the project up for structural reasons.  According to one newspaper report:

“Among the building deficiencies identified by developers: Low ceiling height, compromised views from small windows, an inefficient layout for use as residential or hotel units, unusable space created by the large lobby and atrium, inconsistent floor elevations on the second floor, narrow elevators that don’t comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, concern that replacement of the floors could risk structural instability of the building because of the way the floors are anchored to the building’s perimeter walls.”– “Sterling’s Fate in County’s Hands”, Times Leader, April 16, 2011

But as a community, we just kept going on this “preservation agenda” relentlessly. Given my short-lived experience as an activist for the building, I see how a fever begins to spread that ultimately builds these building owners up for a success that will never be realized because it is being built upon a false premise.  When I first started asking community leaders about what we could do to save the Sterling, most of them responded with “Tell the owner that you want to rent an apartment or commercial space in the building.” Which I found really weird, because I’m not a business owner and I don’t want to live near Market Street, so when I would push for a different answer or more information, they would tell me that it’s just what you do if you want to save a building.

Knowing that, while reading through old newspaper archives about the preservation project, one quote from the paper really stuck out in my mind:

 “Without any formal marketing, CityVest board members can’t go to any functions in town without somebody expressing interest”, Rogers said.” – “State Ensuring Preservation of Hotel Sterling’s Legacy:  Bureau for Historical Preservation Will OK CityVest’s Progress”, Citizens’ Voice, June 7, 2005

Were these people also being told to falsely tell CityVest representatives that they wanted to live/work in the building? And if so, would CityVest have stopped redevelopment plans sooner if there wasn’t this “false” community buzz about the project that didn’t reflect ANYTHING about the local economy or real estate market? I guess we’[ll never know, because with all of the finger-pointing going on, I’m sure no one affiliated with CityVest will ever agree to publicly talk about the failed project.  Which is a shame; there is a lot that we as a community could gain by having that discussion.”

Hotel Sterling Historical Lesson #4—Know when to walk away

While well intentioned,  the Hotel Sterling preservation seemed doomed almost from the very beginning when you take the time to look back over newspaper coverage concerning the project from the very beginning. (You can find excepts of this newspaper coverage (contained in another post on this site)  While many people blame the failure of the project on CityVest, the last owner of the Hotel Sterling, it is obvious that evidence clearly suggested that a positive preservation outcome may have been highly improbable to achieve in the end.  It is striking to realize that local journalists were referring to the structure as decaying and decrepit as far back as 2001—a red flag about the magnitude of the project itself and the funds required for completion.

Dawn 10Photo Credit:  Dawn Robinson

Another red flag that should have slapped our community leaders directly in the face was the fact that developer after developer passed on the project.  We should have just STOPPED at the point where funding had been exhausted with no developer in sight willing to take on a $32 million dollar historic preservation project.  But the hubris-filled love of our past, found our leaders scrambling for even MORE FUNDING  in order to declare the owners of the structure, CityVest, the “the developer of last chance”.   The fact that the newspapers were using that phrase should have signaled “danger” to the community at large. 

The entire concept for the Sterling project (& the other historic structures included in the “Susquehanna Landing” vision) may have been too “high-end” for the reality of the Wilkes-Barre real estate market. For years, the public was being sold on an upscale vision, when in reality, that market/location has only attracted volunteer services and companies specializing in addiction rehabilitation.

Another issue that was hinted at from the inception of the Sterling project was that Wilkes-Barre’s reputation for corrupt political dealings was going to make it difficult to attract serious developers who wanted to invest in our community. Since that time, we all know that things have only taken a turn for the worst—“Kids for Cash”, need I say more?!  The fact remains that the preservation enthusiasts in our community  need to consider the real-world obstacles that Wilkes-Barre faces while moving forward with any more projects now, or in the future. 

 Stacy 6

Photo Credit: Stacy Shannon

When historic preservation is discussed in Luzerne County, the conversation is very one-sided, and usually consists of attempts by preservationists to guilt the public into letting proponents have their way by insisting that people “don’t value history” if they are against a restoration project. It’s time to get real about historic preservation in Luzerne County. The fact is, that because of changes in the structure of the global market and the national economy, communities that have not been investing wisely in their history when things were really good, are going to lose a lot of that history now!

It makes more sense to maintain structures BEFORE they become long-term vacancies, than it does to attempt to engage in heroic “life saving” measures after the fact.   Like it or not, “saving history” is a big ticket project that requires the help of outside private developers who are going to be looking for a return on their investment. And while there are plenty of entities who will encourage communities to move forward with such projects, there are none who will assist them in assessing the situation beforehand to see if such a project is even viable in the first place.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION in and of itself is BIG BUSINESS. Who can we count on to tell us when taking on a project may not be feasible in our community? Is the consulting firm hired to market the project going to do it? Are all of the architect firms that stand to benefit from the proposed project going sound the alarms? Will non-profit entities such as Preservation Pennsylvania, who earn their keep pushing a preservation or “history” agenda, do it?  NO. 

Stacy 2Photo Credit: Stacy Shannon

When Wilkes-Barre discusses historic preservation, the conversation always seems focused on the structure itself and what CAN be done (& believe me, SOMETHING can ALWAYS be done) to save it, but no one ever seems to  question what SHOULD be done when all of the external factors are considered.

Stacy 4Photo Credit: Stacy Shannon

Many components need to be in place in a community to successfully complete a multi-million dollar historic preservation project. What in Luzerne County has changed that would make success in ANY expensive historic preservation effort a possibility today? I hope I’m wrong, but I don’t believe that anyone has an answer to that question as our community is now faced with deciding what should happen to the entire cluster of vacant “Zombie” historic buildings inhabiting the city block once designated for the “Susquehanna Landing” community redevelopment vision.

The fact that all of these vacancies even exist  is quite mind blowing,  considering that they have been sitting, untouched for years, just one block away from the epicenter of Wilkes-Barre, and also one block away from the city’s institutions of higher learning.  And just like the owners of the Hotel Sterling, the owners of these remaining structures cannot afford to fix or maintain them either!  And sadly, the taxpayers technically own many of these buildings, thanks to someone’s failed plan that involved community entities buying them AFTER they became vacant!

Hotel Sterling Historical Lesson #5–Even when “zombie” real-estate is privately owned,

if the owner falls into financial dire straits,

the distressed building becomes a burden for the taxpayer

What a grand, public resource eating, Zombie Hotel the Sterling eventually became!  And this is often the case for all Zombie Buildings, even if they are historic!  People forget that just sitting there, doing nothing, these vacant buildings are costing SOMEONE money—usually the taxpayer in one way or another! Taxes are either being paid or are being forgiven.  Insurance premiums need to be maintained by SOMEONE.  The price of having vacant and blighted real estate littering the landscape can become an insurmountable burden for any city, scaring away prospective business owners and real estate investors. 

And now we are forced to ponder the ugly and expensive question about what needs to be done with the rest of the zombie real estate that has taken up residence within this same block, waiting for the day when our past was supposed to redeem our city in the present.  How many more parcels of the decaying remains of a by-gone era can our community possibly try to maintain before we push ourselves beyond the prospect of having any real hope for the future?

Dawn 8Photo Credit: Dawn Robinson

Today as we begin the process of dismantling our brick and fake marble corpse of innovation and prosperity known as the Hotel Sterling, we SHOULD mourn its passing because it was built to fulfill a need created by abundance.  Unfortunately, whatever we put there now, will ultimately be damned, because we will be building it out of desperation.    

We are a community, extinguishing our past in the present, and transitioning into what we will become in the future.  The Hotel Sterling is a story about the death of a chapter in American History that begins with the end of the industrial revolution.  For decades, our community has attempted to outrun our diminished expectations for a way of life that we can no longer hope to maintain.   The demolition of the Hotel Sterling should serve as a harsh wake-up call about our community’s impoverished current reality. At one point considered a monolith of our affluent class’s achievement, what remained was ultimately nothing but blight on our city’s landscape.  

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ONE FINAL WORD FROM THE FORGOTTEN PLACES OF NEPA

Ed 1Photo Credit:  Ed Mountjoy

Ed Mountjoy, the face behind The Forgotten Place of NEPA on Facebook, had the extraordinary opportunity to watch the fireworks display at Kirby Park, from inside of the abandoned Hotel Sterling this year. (Way to go Ed!  You are my Urban Exploration hero!)  He explains:

“Seeing the fireworks from the Hotel Sterling that night was surely something I don’t ever expect to forget. Being up there, on the seventh floor, sitting there by that window, which was missing its bottom part of glass, was an odd feeling. It wasn’t odd in a bad way, but odd as in that I could actually picture people doing the very same thing back when the Sterling was occupied. The fact that it was dark all around, except for outside, added to the feeling, since the darkness covered up the fact about how gutted and decayed the building really was. While sitting on the floor watching the fireworks, I could just imagine someone in that very room doing the same thing decades ago. It was a historic view that many got to see in the past and, with this passing Fourth of July, it would be the last time anyone would get this view, from this very building, of the fireworks. Knowing this would be the very last year, I knew I had to get up there to see them.”

Ed Continues:

“This is WHY I maintain The Forgotten Places of NEPA and The Forgotten Coal Industry of NEPA on Facebook.  Places like the Sterling, won’t always be around.  Many, if not all, of the places I’ve been to have meaning to at least someone, whether it’s a small building on the side of a barely used road or structures that occupy spaces at the busiest of intersections. At some point, people worked and/or lived in these places, people I am sure have relatives that are alive today, relatives that may wanna see where their ancestors worked/lived at. I maintain these pages to keep those memories as alive as I can and I’m sure others seeing these photos trigger memories of either them working/living there, or knowing about family and/or friends who worked/lived there. Many might think that my pages are strictly just about urban exploring, but it’s not. Granted, most my photos involve having to do so, but I do it because I know many who’d like to see such photos can’t go there themselves. I do so, not just to explore the locations and get piles of photos, even though that is the best part of the experience, but to, hopefully, trigger some memories from others and maybe even learn a little more about these locations from those people.”

 SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

Photo Credit: Ed Mountjoy

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 Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

Hotel Sterling: The UnDead Days

Abandoned Hotel Sterling: A Room With A View

 Zombie buildings are real.  It was a term first coined by financial analysts to explain the national collapse of the commercial real estate market as far back as 2006, and has expanded to represent all buildings that are unusable due to disrepair, because they are owned by entities that are too broke to fix them.

Based upon “Hotel Sterling: The UnDead Days”,  Welcome To The Zombie Hotel Sterling is now available for digital download at Amazon.com!  If you don’t have a Kindle device, don’t worry, you can download a free Kindle app for your smart phone or computer right here!

Book Description:

Abandoned and rotting away along the banks of the mighty Susquehanna River, the zombified Hotel Sterling tells its tale of fading grandeur and woe to a photographer visiting the deteriorating structure, seeking to photographically document the reality of the condition of the building, as the hotel waits for its beloved community to decide its fate, once and for all.

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Read an interview about “Welcome to the Zombie Sterling” at: 570 Mine Fire

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Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

The Sexy Side of Abandonment: Scranton Lace Pin-Up Girls

Lace A

Giving New Meaning To “Scranton Lace”

Anyone who explores abandoned buildings eventually runs into evidence that suggests a whole lot of sex goes on within those dark, sticky and usually moist spaces. Like a passionate affair, ruins are exciting!  Standing in one makes your heart beat faster and the world outside fades from your consciousness as time stands still, and you’re thrust into another world.

Presently, many of Northeastern Pennsylvania’s abandonments are understandably being utilized as backdrops for music videos by local bands such as Astorian Stigmata, and fashion photo shoots by bloggers like Riss Vandal of Fashion Vandals.  And now, thanks to Sullivan’s Pin-Up Photography, the Scranton Lace Factory has a whole new visual image to ponder and appreciate!

Scranton Lace, a factory basically abandoned by the owner in 2002, when workers were informed that it was closing “effective immediately”, first became a popular site among people who engage in Urban Exploration photography, and photojournalists covering our nation’s age of industrial decline.  Now, with the facility currently under renovation in order to bring it back to life, photographer Bonnie Sullivan was able to secure the location in order to conduct one of her specialty Pin-Up Model photo shoots.

Knowing how much I loved photographing Scranton Lace, since I’d been there several times before, Bonnie graciously asked me to stop by during the event, where I was able to convince two of her models to give my readers an inside look at becoming a Pin-Up model for the day.  And after watching this process in action, I truly believe that every woman should do it at least once, just to be able to say they’ve done it.  Apparently, transforming yourself into a Pin-Up is one of those pivotal, life-changing experiences, in terms of confidence building! And in this hyper-connected, social media world, who doesn’t want to feel more confident while having their picture taken?!

Jennifer Walsh-Crosland was the first model to arrive. “This is fucking awesome”, were the initial words out of her saucy red painted lips as she strutted into Scranton Lace’s now infamous bowling alley, with her ruby “ribbon candy” pumps and Bettie Page store shopping bag.  Jennifer, who has done this type of thing before, was excited to finally see the interior of the Scranton Lace Factory.  It had been one of her ambitions for quite a while.  She said, “I was excited because the building and the company have such a historical influence on the culture of this city. It’s been around since the 1890’s, employed many of our area residents throughout the years, and holds so much energy.”

Lace C

And as an added bonus for her spouse, who escorted her to the shoot, Mr. Crosland was also able to get a private behind-the- scenes look at that history all for himself.  “He enjoyed being able to walk around the building while I was doing the shoot. He got some really great pictures from a place that we would have otherwise never had the opportunity to be inside”, Jennifer shared.

The next model to show up was Nikki Falcone, which seems like a name ready-made for an alluring Pin-Up bombshell.  This was her first experience, so her entrance was a little more subdued as she took in the entire scene, which could be a little intimidating for a first-timer.  But as Nikki watched Jennifer in action, under Bonnie Sullivan’s expert direction, she seemed to become more at ease.  It was clear that Bonnie, with the support of her husband Joe Sullivan, was running this show.  “Walk with a little swagger”, she instructed Jennifer, as she stood, in those spectacular red heels, in the middle of a post-apocalyptical looking bowling lane, with two weathered bowling pins grasped in her hands.  “Don’t hold them evenly”, she directed, “hold one pin by the neck and the other down further.”

At one point, while adjusting Jennifer’s dress by hiking it further up her thigh, Bonnie told Jennifer, “Yes, you ARE that kind of girl! Go with it!”, as she snapped her camera shutter closed several times in quick succession.  “Act like you own it”, she instructed Jennifer, “Lift ‘the girls’ (Pin-Up speak for boobs) and cinch the waste!”

Jennifer

Jennifer

When asked about the onslaught of posing instructions, Jennifer responded “The direction that she gives is what makes it so awesome! I mean, I’m just a normal chick; I’m goofy and uncoordinated, but with Bonnie & Joe behind the camera, all of that goes away. They just have a way that makes you feel so comfortable and so confident!”

I asked Jennifer if, after working with professional photographers, she had one posing tip that she would share with others to make their own pictures better. Her response was, “If it feels weird in the moment, more than likely, that’s going to be the best pose of the day!”

The next model to step into the spotlight was Nikki Falcone, who was doing the photo shoot as a gift for her husband, who is into all things retro, as a gift for their anniversary.  “He’s been looking up a lot of (Pin-Up) pictures”, she explained, “So rather than be jealous of those models, I thought maybe I could do just as well.” And do it, Nikki did!

“If you feel comfortable, your photos will look awkward.  So be uncomfortable”, instructed Bonnie from behind the lens, as she led Nikki through some shots on top of the roof of the massive industrial complex.  “Do you want to pretend like you are climbing the ladder in your heels?” Bonnie asked Nikki before telling her to climb up one or two rungs.  “Get your “girls” to the right (those boobies again)”, she shouted to Nikki before taking the picture.

During my time watching Bonnie in action, I couldn’t help but notice how often she mentioned “the girls” to her models.  So I had to ask her how important boobs are when creating a compelling Pin-Up image.  “The Pin-Up is all about cleavage, leg and facial expression”, Bonnie explained, “If you look at all the classic pin-ups of Vargas or Elgrin, they have elongated legs and/or lots of cleavage that go along with their curvy, and never waif-like, bodies. After all, pin-ups were used as a distraction back in the day, and if you’re going to distract the boys from their troubles of war, legs, cleavage and curves were just the thing to do it, no?”

Nikki

Nikki

If the purpose of the Pin-Up girls of the past was to provide a distraction from the horrors of war, I wondered if the resurging interest in Pin-Ups is a reflection of something about the times we live in now.

Bonnie offered her opinion, “Perhaps…and that just may be a large part of it. But I also think that a lot of women just want some “me time” for a minute. Women from all walks of life, have just become so busy these days. We get up in the morning and stand in front of the mirror, tossing our hair up in a knot, or quickly getting ourselves presentable for our work day. We don’t take time to primp and pamper ourselves these days like they did “back in the day”, because we don’t have the time with our busy work schedules, balancing the kid’s schedules, working, husbands, etc.  And I think some of the women who come to us for sessions just want to feel that “old school glamour” again, who want some “me time” and have photos to create the memory.  Because once they leave our session—BAM–they’re thrown back into their horrendous schedules and busy lives. So in a sense, this could be a “distraction” of another kind, not from war, but a distraction from our rushed lifestyles.”

“We’ve also become bombarded with sexual images in our daily lives — some tasteful and some not so tasteful”, Bonnie continued, “The Pin-Up image takes that notion and throws it back to “old school” when sexual images were fun, flirty and only hinting at “naughtiness”.  It takes you back to a time when society was more turned on by the curves of the female body underneath clothing than full on, in your face nudity.  That’s not to say we have anything against tasteful nude images.  We don’t!     Nude doesn’t equal pornography, though.  There’s a definite difference.  I think these are just a few of the reasons for the resurgence.”

I asked Bonnie what motivated her to start taking Pin-Up style photos in the first place.  “I’ve always enjoyed the Pin-Up image”, she replied, “A friend asked me to do a photo shoot of her for a “Pin-Up calendar” she wanted to give as a Christmas gift to her boyfriend. She emailed me and said it’s something she wanted to do, and just never felt like she knew a photographer who would pull off what she was looking for. She was familiar with my style of photography and had seen some of the work that I’ve done in the past. So, I agreed, and it was one of the most fun days I’ve ever had — that we both had, really! I loved editing her photos and seeing such beautiful images that I helped to create.   That’s when I turned to Joe — knowing this was something we just had to work on together out of our mutual love, not just for the classic Pin-Ups, but photography as well. I remember telling Joe that if I truly believe everything happens for a reason, then, that day was no accident and was meant to set us on a path of the business we have today.”

I wanted to know what motivated women to want to be photographed in this way.  “Several reasons”, Bonnie explained, “Some do it as a gift for their significant other. Some do it because they need a “pick me up” after a devastating event such as divorce–or in some cases, maybe that’s more of a celebration and not so much a “pick me up”! Ha-ha! Others do it to celebrate a weight loss or some other turning point in their life. Some want to take a minute out of their busy schedule and feel beautiful and glamorous. And then, others do it just because they love the art of Pin-Up photography and want to emulate their favorite Pin-Up models.  It really is a personal thing; we find that the reasons are varied.”

I wondered what motivate these particular models to want to do this. Nikki said that the idea came to her after seeing the result of a photo shoot that one of her friends did with Bonnie & Joe at a candy shop. Jennifer was also motivated to participate by a friend, who happened to share a post from Sullivan’s on Facebook.  “They were offering a photo shoot package at a great price, with a donation for Toys for Tots”, she said, “I thought it was a great way to be able to get a special Christmas gift for my husband and do a good deed at the same time.”

“I will be really honest”, Jennifer explained, “The first shoot I did, I was REALLY nervous, but after it was all said and done I LOVED IT!! Everything about it, going out and finding the perfect outfit to match the theme I wanted to go with, finding the right pair of shoes that were really going to POP in the shoot. Having hair & make up done–the pampering was one of my guilty pleasures.”

For this photo shoot, Jennifer opted to make a special trip to Philadelphia in order to find the perfect dress.  “It was AWESOME!”, Jennifer exclaimed, I made a trip to the iconic Bettie Page store because even though I had a ton of places I could order a dress from, I wanted to go to a place where I could try on several dresses, to make sure I got the perfect one, not only did I look great, but I felt very comfortable.”

Lace F

Nikki said that she fell in love with her dress at pinupgirlclothing.com.  Bonnie says that clients can always check with her to see if she has any Pin-Up inspired clothing on-hand that appeals to them.  “We’re still building our wardrobe”, she explained, but we have several dresses ranging in size from 4 to 18. If we don’t have their size yet, then we can definitely direct them to a few places where  great finds can be had.”

Bonnie encourages clients to consult with her prior to their scheduled shoot because she can help them with all aspects of preparation in order to create the perfect Pin-Up look. “We offer hair and makeup as a complimentary service, EXCEPT for venue shoots where there are multiple shoots, and it’s just not possible time-wise.  Shiloh Salon & Day Spa in Olyphant actually work with us and give all our clients a 20% discount when they go there to have their hair/make up done right before a shoot.  They are a fabulous team and a Pin-Up inspired salon with images of Audrey Hepburn, Bettie Page and Marilyn Monroe adorning the walls.  If a client just doesn’t have the funds for getting their hair/make up professionally done, YouTube is a great tool for vintage/retro/pin-up hairstyles!”, she told me.

Of course models can also take charge of creating the look they want all for themselves, as Nikki did, “Stephanie Rozelle from Head to Toe Salon did my hair and makeup, she is a friend I’ve known since high school.”

Jennifer

Jennifer

The definition of a Pin-Up Girl is basically any model whose image garners wide appeal.  I wanted to know if, as a photographer, Bonnie thought that every woman has an inner Pin-Up Girl waiting to be unleashed.

She responded, “I think so. Some of the best sessions we’ve had were of self-proclaimed “tomboys” who wanted to embrace their feminine side for a day. You don’t have to be a “girlie girl” to want to feel beautiful as a Pin-Up for a day. Pin-Up is a genre that crosses a wide range of backgrounds and social statuses. We’ve worked with ladies who have their doctorate degree in education, to hairstylists, to the fast food employee, and the stay at home mom.  Ladies everywhere, no matter who and what title they hold, want to be a beautiful Pin-Up to some degree for one day! It’s fun! It’s something out of the daily grind! And it’s something you walk away with a memory of , as well as prints to hang on your wall or share with your significant other!”

Jennifer added, “There are a lot of women that secretly have a little Pin-Up vixen inside them.”  While Nikki said,  “Absolutely!  Every woman has their own style and appeal and some just need to find it and share it.”

I wanted to know if these ladies had any advice for women who secretly wanted to do this but didn’t think they had enough confidence to actually pull it off.

Jennifer responded, ” If you’ve ever wanted to go outside of your norm, break out of the box, yet do it in a really classy way–DO THIS!! I’m the first to tell you, I may have a big personality, but I’m really, really shy –I’m my own contradiction—but this experience took me WAY out of my comfort zone, and I’m glad that I did it. It brought me out of my proverbial shell – not just by having the pictures taken, but then again, when Bonnie & Joe share them on their Facebook page. It’s out there, for all to see – take it or leave it, like or not – it’s me.”

Nikki said that anyone can do it, with the right attitude.  “Own your pictures,” she said, “ The confidence definitely shines through and the more you think “I’m awesome, I’m beautiful, I can do this” the better the photos seem to be.”

Bonnie Photographing Nikki

Bonnie Photographing Nikki

Bonnie's picture of Nikki

Bonnie’s picture of Nikki

Bonnie explained, “I think we all feel like that to a degree, no?  But I would tell her that no one ever goes in front of a camera without feeling nervous.  Every woman is her own worst critic. A Pin-Up session is often a great way to empower yourself and embrace your body and all of its imperfections.  Pin-Up isn’t about being the perfect weight, the perfect height, the right size nose, or any of that.    You never have to feel as though you “measure up” in the Pin-Up genre! It’s the one genre that accepts and actually appreciates the curvier body over the less curvy frames.”

I wondered if the models learned anything about themselves by participating in this experience.  Nikki responded, “That most of my insecurities are in my head. And the pictures allow me to see what my husband sees in me all along.”  While Jennifer explained, “I’ve solidified that fact that when I want something bad enough, I make it happen, which makes me realize that I am stronger than I think I am.”

And of course we had to discuss the challenges of doing a photo shoot with models at a venue like Scranton Lace.  The first time I had the opportunity to take photos at this location; I was there with people dressed more like doomsday preppers, in army fatigues and steel toe boots, which is a far cry from pretty dresses and designer pumps!

Nikki said that walking around the debris in heels was the biggest problem for her, “My normal day shoes are DC Skater shoes, so heels can be a challenge on normal ground. The roof was interesting too since my heels sunk right in.”

According to Bonnie, “The debris is a challenge sometimes; you obviously want your clients to be safe as they walk around in their heels.  Not having electricity for our lighting can also be challenging.  You want the shots to be bright, crisp and well lit for the client.”

I asked Bonnie why she chose the Scranton Lace Factory as a location in the first place.  “I’m a fan of abandoned buildings because of the “beauty of decay” that I find appealing –which is why I like to put Pin-Ups in such places ,the contrast of the beauty vs. decay of something once beautiful”, she said, “Scranton Lace has some fantastic architecture and amenities  like the bowling alley  that just worked so well with the Pin-Up theme whether it be the classic retro Pin-Up or even the lingerie session we did there.”

Nikki thought the setting was a perfect place for a Pin-Up shoot, “The clash of beauty against the beast I guess you can call it. Here’s someone put together so well, against a backdrop of urban decay, something that’s falling apart, and it just makes her stand out that much more. It’s very visually stimulating.”

And Jennifer added, “What was appealing to me was the fact that here I was, all done up and looking HOT – standing in a beautiful ruin. I feel it’s the perfect combination of the two.”

Obviously, Scranton Lace is important historically. And unfortunately, we live in a time when many historic buildings exist as “zombie buildings”–a real world term that is being used to describe buildings that are not usable for their intended purpose because they are in need of repair, and are owned by entities that cannot afford to do so.  I wanted to know if Bonnie thought  that allowing photographers to use these locations for photo shoots could be beneficial in any way for the building owners in terms of generating renewed interest in gaining public support to try to save these buildings.

“Absolutely!”, she enthusiastically responded, “The general public often times only sees these buildings/structures from the outside and has NO idea of how absolutely gorgeous and stunning some of these buildings are on the inside! And by allowing photographers inside to hold shoots, once the public sees some of these photos — suddenly that building is no longer just the “brick building down the street”, instead they see the building in a whole new light.”

Jennifer said, ”These buildings may be skeletons of their former selves but they still hold so much beauty and that beauty deserves some recognition. I couldn’t wait to get inside to feel it. On my way out, I stood in a huge empty room, which I could only assume held looms at one point… it was so quiet, all I could hear was myself breathing , but the energy I felt was electrifying! That’s what I was looking forward to – that feeling – it’s hard to describe, unless you’ve felt it for yourself , but for that few minutes, I could close my eyes and feel the building.”

Scranton Lace Factory: The Loom Room is History Now  {EXPLORE}

Scranton Lace Loom Room April 2011

Lace Blog 48

Scranton Lace Loom Room September 2011

I asked Bonnie to describe the Pin-Up Model experience for someone who has never done it before. “It is empowering”, she said, “ and addictive if I were to judge by how many repeat clients we have, and how they tell us their experience with us is like getting a tattoo.  Once you have one, you want more!    None of our clients are “professional” Pin-Up models, at least not to date.  Every one of them that does this for the first time, initially they’re nervous, and by the end of it, they’re beaming with excitement, confidence, thanking us and telling us how much fun they had and can’t wait to do it again. I think it goes beyond the “fun” aspect. I think they feel empowered and that’s what is addictive. The empowerment of embracing their bodies in a way that perhaps they never thought they could or ever would.”

I asked how a client should prepare themselves mentally before their photo shoot.  “Empower yourself by practicing some classic Pin-Up poses and/or facial expressions in the mirror. It’ll give you a chance to see how you look, what poses you find flattering to yourself, and it’ll put some control into your lap at your session”, Bonnie responded,” We always tell our clients that you really need to exaggerate everything for Pin-Up–if you feel foolish when posing the way we direct you to, or with a particular facial expression, then you’re doing it right and your photo will be perfect! And a glass of wine before your session doesn’t hurt either….. but ONE glass, not ONE bottle. Drunk isn’t beautiful, Ha-ha!  And expect LOTS OF FUN!  Joe and I are very laid back and like to have fun as well as make it fun for our clients!  Joe and I shoot at the same time, from different angles, maximizing photo options/angles for the client.  I usually do all the directing, so it’s not confusing for the client —- and while I’m directing, Joe is usually keeping an eye out for flaws in the shot like a clothing tag sticking out, a hem problem in a dress or whatever the case may be.  But Joe and I like to have fun and crack jokes.  There’ve been times when models have had a hard time making their “Pin-Up expression” because they’re laughing so hard at our nonsensical banter.”

I noticed that the models seemed to become more confident as their photo shoot progressed.  Bonnie told me that my assessment was 100% accurate. “I think the atmosphere that Joe and I try to create during the shoot helps our clients to loosen up and ease their concerns about their flaws”, she explained, “We’ll ask ahead of time if there is anything about their bodies they just hate –face it, we all have those issues!– and even what parts they love about themselves!  We’ll try to down-play that imperfection during their session.  I think our clients see that as we start shooting, and it helps to boost their confidence knowing that we are going to be sure we photograph their best and down-play what they’re not fond of.  We try to keep the atmosphere light and help ease their anxiety. We crack jokes; we try to involve them in the outcome of their experience by asking if there’s any particular shot/pose they want to try.    And even if they have shot with us before, I think the anticipation of having their shoot, sometimes planned months in advance, has them amped up and rocking their nerves, and once they begin the shoot they’re like “Oh yeah, I forgot how easy this groove is!”

I asked what Bonnie thought her husband added, as the male perspective, to the creation of the Pin-Up image.  She explained, “Face it, a man will see a woman in a completely different light and with a completely different appreciation than another  female does — it’s in our wiring, photographer or not. There are times when Joe will suggest something or add a little “tweak” to the shot or pose….. But just the same, it’s that suggestion/tweak that takes it from sexy to “WHOA!!” Joe appreciates the art in the female form and he uses that appreciation to help create some stunning images in our business!  I know there are Pin-Up photographers out there who tout themselves as an “all female team” and that’s great —  there are women who may not be comfortable with a male photographer. But, we’ve been told by a few of our clients they appreciate the “male eye”, particularly for boudoir sessions when the client is giving the gift to the man in her life.”

Boudoir Model at Scranton Lace

Boudoir Model at Scranton Lace

I wanted to know if a man should ever consider purchasing a Pin-Up photo session as a gift for the woman in his life.  Bonnie thinks it would make a great present because “what a fantastic compliment it would be for your significant other to say “Hey honey, I bought you a Pin-Up photography session!”     Wouldn’t that say that he/she already thinks you’re an amazing, sexy being and wants to see it brought to life in Pin-Up form??”

You can find more pictures from the Scranton Lace Pin-Up photo shoot on the Sullivan Pin-Up Photography Facebook Page and contact information, as well as other photos, on their website.

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Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

The Abandoned Picnic Grove Of The Soul

Once upon a time, when things were much more laid back and life was simpler, communities enjoyed gathering at popular outdoor spots on a regular basis to eat food in the great outdoors, and enjoy each other’s company.   As a result, some simplistic structures were erected to help make these get-togethers a little more civilized.   The concept of “the picnic grove” was quite popular in the northeastern part of Pennsylvania.  So popular, that many sites later added more sophisticated “amusements”.

The Lehigh Valley Picnic Grounds were opened in the late 1800s, at Harvey’s Lake, and they later morphed into a full blown amusement park know as Hanson’s.

Roller Coaster Remains @ Hanson's Abandoned Amusement Park, Harvey's Lake, Pennsylvania

A roller coaster skeleton remnant at Hanson’s Abandoned Amusement Park

When Croop’s Glen first opened on Route 11 near Nanticoke, its main attraction was the waterfall and picnic area.

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Abandoned Picnic Grove Tables at Croop’s Glen

Angela Park , in Mountain Top,  was first used by the land owners as a site for picnics and family gatherings.

This Used To Be My Playground--“Angela Park: An American Eulogy”

Abandoned Pool Area Control Room at Angela Park

Even the amusement park with the longest run of any of the parks in the region, Rocky Glen, first opened as a picnic facility.
Rocky Glen Park Sign

One picnic grove that I was familiar with as a child was the one perched above St Mary’s Cemetery in Plymouth, Pennsylvania.  I don’t recall ever attending an actual event at the picnic grove, but I do remember going there when I was little to pick pinecones and to ride the swings.  I went back there recently, out of curiosity, and found that those swings were long gone…..

The Abandoned Picnic Grove Of The Soul

People would follow the stone staircase….

APGOTS 3

……..near the stone alter

APGOTS 2

…..up to the picnic area

APGOTS 4

APGOTS 5

APGOTS 1

APGOTS 6

The swings are long gone…and the frame has rusted apart

APGOTS 7

APGOTS 8

APGOTS 9

Abandoned Outhouse

APGOTS 10

APGOTS 11

St Mary’s Cemetery Angels

Earthbound Angels   1

Angel in Stone 3

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Cheri Sundra © 2013
All Rights Reserved

 

Fashion in Ruins

With Riss Vandal of FASHION VANDALS

Photo Credit:  57NOPhotography

Goth ARooftop Anime Glam @

Fashion Vandals

It’s been said that “nothing has the power to tell the truth about an age quite like fashion”.  That statement has never been more accurate than it is today, in the era of the fashion blogger.   Just as blogging has been challenging the control of public information as wielded by big, corporate owned newspapers and broadcasting networks, independent fashion bloggers have been usurping the influence of traditional high fashion magazines.  That’s not to say that a “Devil Wears Prada” Miranda Priestly-type magazine editor still can’t declare an entire line a catastrophe by simply pursing her lips, but as she’s seated in the front row line-up at Fashion Week, amongst the fashion bloggers and their laptops, her point of view is no longer necessarily the first to reach the fashion-hungry masses or the throngs of chic-hunter consumers.  

Photo Credit:Carlos Phillips Images

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Endless Autumn @

Fashion Vandals

Just as Big Media has been losing journalists for years when they run out of formats and room for their ideas, a new breed of fashion reporter is turning to the internet to bring a different kind of fashion news coverage to their audience.    Marissa Phillips, aka Riss Vandal, is the lady who runs the show at Fashion Vandals.com.    When asked to explain the role of a fashion blogger to the uninitiated, Vandal explains, “It’s a blogger who focuses on some aspect of fashion or style–whether through tutorials, trend-reporting, outfit posts, interviews and features, or even people with lifestyle blogs that happen to have notable personal style end up being considered fashion bloggers. It can take a lot of forms. The main idea behind Fashion Vandals is to highlight designers, models, and brands that are making bold statements and taking chances, and to celebrate styles that lie outside the mainstream.” 

Goth C

Robert Smith and Siouxsie Sioux Had a Visual Kei Baby @

Fashion Vandals

While designers taking risks is hardly anything new, the cultural/historical trends and artistic expressions of any era always help to influence the fashion risk-takers of that current age.  During the height of World War II, for example, Paris fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli famously collaborated with well-known artists of the Surrealist movement, such as Salvador Dali, to transform something as ordinary and mundane as clothing, into strangely beautiful and contradictory works of art.  Her designs were considered outrageous and outright shocking.  But the women who dared to wear Schiaparelli’s designs morphed from mere mortals into surreal apparitions.  For the first time in history, life was literally imitating art!  Even today, Riss Vandal definitely agrees with that sentiment, “If you’re someone that dutifully follows trends, or simply dresses for comfort or to suit a certain situation, I guess fashion can be seen as a hobby or simply something utilitarian. But for those who use fashion for expressive or transformative means, I don’t think fashion is similar to art, I think fashion IS art.”

I asked Vandal what she thought about popular culture’s current obsession with death, which may not be completely surprising, given that we’ve lived through more than one apocalypse last year!  Since even romance is reflected via the undead in the youth of today, I wondered aloud if it is in some way, a metaphor about modern life.  Riss responded,” I feel like I can really only answer this in terms of my own experience…and when I was younger I was first drawn, I wouldn’t say to death culture, but to dark culture, because finding inspiration from the darker aspects of life is one way I sort of made sense of it all and came to terms with it.  And really, I think most people are looking for signs that there’s more to life than what it seems, a sort of magic or mystery beneath the surface, and so at times society’s attentions turn to ghosts, or magic, or aliens…just now it happens to be undead creatures such as zombies and vampires.”  

Goth D

Daywalkers Don’t Model For Lipservice @

Fashion Vandals

This pop culture death obsession is definitely reflected in Riss’s Fashion Vandals blog.  “I wouldn’t quite call it a Goth blog,” she explains, “but it certainly has a dark fashion focus.”

“Goth” or not, it is a vibe that is channeling its way into the mainstream fashion arena, and even creeping into the collections of haute couture designers like Alexander McQueen, with designs that are blatantly TWILIGHT-inspired

I asked Ms. Vandal what she thought about the fact that mainstream designers are now attempting to deliver a Goth-edge to department store consumer goods.  She states, “For the past year or so, every day has felt like Goth Christmas when I’ve went out shopping. It’s never been too easy to find affordable dark styles–but at the same time, I’ve never seen the market so inundated with horrid, cheesy takes on Goth style–do not get me started on bedazzled pentagrams and crucifixes.”

I wondered what inspired Vandal to become interested in alternative fashion.  She said, “I was incredibly shy as a kid, but I remember always wanting to visually stand out, and gaining some sort of defiant confidence through that. Then when I was 12, I went to my first punk show, where everyone was fearless and rocking wigs, and spikes, and tri-hawks…and I instantly fell in love and decided I wanted to be surrounded by that forever.  I feel like I’ve pretty much had the exact same style since I was 15, now it’s just a bit more polished.”

Photo Credit: Carlos Phillips Images

Goth E

Skeletal Distinction @

Fashion Vandals

I’ve noticed that people who are into Goth/alternative fashions also seem to share a fascination with the Victorian Era.  I asked Ms. Vandal to explain why.  “There’s such beauty and drama to the era, but also a definite darkness…especially in terms of the mourning culture,” Riss said,  “I’ve just always found the visual pageantry, but also the contrasts, so fascinating. And Victorian-inspired fashion has a huge impact on Goth style–corsets, parasols, fingerless gloves—are all major aspects of Goth fashion.”

Photo Credit: Cassie McDonald

Goth FThe Wayward Ones @

Fashion Vandals

Another thing Victorians and Goth fans have in common is the cemetery.  “For those who search for inspiration in death and the darker aspects of life, how can it not be fascinating to reflect on an era that assigned exact periods of time and intricate outfits to mourning the dead? And while some people dismiss cemeteries as morbid, others view them as tranquil and beautiful. A beautiful means to come to terms with life’s greatest darkness…which I feel ties in with both the era and the subculture”, explains Vandal.

Goth G

The Blues of Ms. Vondasblut @

Fashion Vandals

Since fashion does posses the power to tell us about the age in which we are living, I asked Riss what she thought fashion was telling us about the era we live in right now.  She thoughtfully explained, “I think we’re a confused, cynical age that glorifies the past and wants to be covered in head-to-toe irony.”

Which brings me, in a roundabout way, to the reason I choose to interview Riss Vandal for my own blog about modern day ruins—- this  “cynical age that glorifies the past”, as we allow the structures of our history to just tragically rot away, like abandoned corpses, without hope of restoration or the dignity of an expeditious burial.  I asked Vandal why she utilizes so many abandoned buildings with historical significance for her fashion photo shoots, and why she thinks ruins are so popular as settings for photographers today.   “I like contrasts and I enjoy finding beauty in decay and deconstruction,” she said, “ I also like locations that have a sense of history, even if I don’t know exactly what that history is…because then it allows me to come up with my own story. And I feel as though the latter, wanting a place with a sense of history, is a feeling shared with many artists/photographers.”

Goth H

Urbanite Vamp @

Fashion Vandals

I personally have to admit, I was a little lost when it came to understanding some of the trendsetting descriptive terms used in the Fashion Vandal blog, so I asked Ms. Vandal to explain the main differences between Punks, Neo-Victorians, Goth Debutantes, and Glam Rockers.  I also wondered if there is an age cut off for any of these looks, given that I may or may not be a few decades….years….older than she is!

 “Spikes, petticoats, combat boots, and hairspray?”, Riss attempts to clarify, “There are both a billion differences and a billion similarities between highly stylized subcultures, but what I meant by the statement in my blog description about “building a world where punks, Neo-Victorians, Goth Debutantes, and Glam Rock Kids can all walk hand-in-hand” is that we should all just find unity through our shared love of loud, dramatic fashion. As for a cut off age–if you can pull something off, then you can pull it off and numbers are arbitrary. I consider fashion a form of artistic expression…and is there an age cutoff for creativity?”

Goth ILess Vamp, More Metal @

Fashion Vandals

I wondered, if the hallmark of Preppy Dressing is always looking the same no matter what the era or fashion dictates, what is the first rule of alternative fashion?  Riss answered, “That’s a tricky question for many reasons, though mainly because alternative fashion encompasses so much–Goth, rockabilly, steampunk, etc…Just anything that isn’t quite mainstream. I think there’s no choice but to say that the first rule is that there are no rules…”

I wanted to know if there are simple ways for everyone to add a little alternative fashion flair to their wardrobe, even if they tend to dress in a way that would be described as “classic” or preppy.    “For simple ways to add edge to a look, in terms of makeup, I’d recommend switching up your usual eyeliner application and try a bold cat eye liner application, or experiment with a pair of dramatic false lashes.  In terms of wardrobe, the next time you see something that makes you think “man, I wish I could wear something like that,” stop thinking about it and just buy it–there’s really nothing edgier than that,” was Vandal’s answer. 

You can follow Riss Vandal on Twitter, Facebook and at Fashion Vandals

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