The UE Magazine Interviews: SCRANTON LACE FACTORY

Scranton Lace Factory: The Loom Room is History Now  {EXPLORE}

Speaking as one myself, I can tell you that urban explorers are vastly misunderstood and our motives are grossly underestimated.  I began photographing ruins in my community about two years ago.  What compels me to do it is a mixture of curiosity and a drive to capture the sense of abandonment in these beloved places where people once lived or worked.

As America moves onward during this current age of our industrial decline, and communities find themselves littered with more abandoned structures than they can financially deal with, urban exploration is growing in popularity.  Explorers are assuming the very public role of modern-day archeologists as they set out to document our downfall, one image at a time.
Abandoned Scranton Lace Factory:  Mass Production Breeds Mindless Repetition

Yet, Urban Exploration is a lot like Fight Club.  It is its own subculture filled with intrigue and drama; it attracts thrill seekers who are bored with the banality of modern ”consumer culture”  life, and it’s a very secretive fraternity.  In fact just like Fight Club, the first rule of urban exploration is that you don’t talk about urban exploration.

Luckily, while we gathered to explore the Scranton Lace Factory, I was able to convince a few “professional” urban explorers—photographers Kevin Brett, Jennifer O’Malia, Katherine Rogers and documentarian Erik Hummel —to participate in a group interview as an attempt to understand the driving motivation behind their passion for this way of life.

The article, “As We Forgive Those Who Trespass Against Us”, is now available through UE Magazine  .

Grab your own copy today and enter the world of Urban Exploration!

Enjoy!

Cheri Sundra

~~ Taking one of NEPA’s most “Urban Exploration Worthy” sites to an international audience!

Extreme Bowling: Uncharted Frontier EZine

Return To

GUERRILLA HISTORY Table of Contents

Cheri Sundra © 2012
All Rights Reserved

Advertisements
    • Anonymous
    • October 14th, 2012

    right on you ue folks who keep memories of better times alive through art,just as other archeologists do.

  1. Respect for history.. Thank you

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s